How to Identify the Best Diet for You—by Looking in the Mirror

Amy Lawrenson

What if I said the answer to diet success had been staring you right in the face all along? Yep, one cursory glance in the mirror could unlock the secret to the diet that will work best for you, you just need to know what you're looking for. Enter personal trainer Thomas Eastham, who specialises in nutrition. I met him on a recent press trip, and during my PT session with him, he told me that it's possible to work out the best diet for you simply by looking at yourself in the mirror and identifying your body type. When it comes to the human form, there are three body types— endomorph, ectomorph and mesomorph—and once you know which one you are, you can follow the diet that is best suited to your type. 

Now it's not magic, if you're serious about losing weight then you need to follow an exercise plan and monitor your calories in and out. In fact, each body type has a macro breakdown (the ratio of fat, carbohydrate and protein intake that you should stick to, more on that later). Plenty of people have found success by tailoring the foods they eat to their body type, want in? Yeah, us too. Keep scrolling to find out how to identify your body type and what to eat.

The Body Types

Ectomorphs 

These are thin individuals characterised by smaller bone structures and thinner limbs, explains Eastham. "Think of a typical endurance athlete," he says, Kate Moss would be an ectomorph too. 

Generally they have a fast metabolic rate and a high carbohydrate tolerance.

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Getty/Gotham/Contributor

"Ectomorphs generally do best with more carbohydrates in their diet, along with a moderate protein and lower fat intake.

A nutrient distribution for this body type might be around 55% carbs, 25% protein, and 20% fat. But don’t drive yourself crazy with the math. Just think higher carbs and lower fat," advises Eastham.

Want to be precise and not sure how to work out your macronutrient (carb, protein and fat) split? We have a handy macros guide here.

Mesomorphs 

"They have medium-sized bone structure and an athletic body," says Eastham. "If they’re active, they usually have a considerable amount of lean mass. Many explosive athletes like wrestlers and gymnasts fit these criteria.

"Mesomorphs tend to be testosterone- and growth hormone–dominant, which means they have a predisposition for muscle gain and the maintenance of a lower body fat," he adds. Misty Copeland would be an example of a mesomorph.

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Getty/Jim Spellman/Contributor

"Mesomorphs typically do best on a mixed diet, consisting of balanced carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. A macronutrient split of 40% carbohydrate, 30% protein, and 30% fat can work well," suggests Eastham.

Endomorphs 

"If you're an endomorph, then you have larger bone structure with higher amounts of total body mass and fat mass," says Eastham. "They tend to be naturally less active. Where the ectomorphs tend to burn off excess calories with near constant movement, excess calories in endomorphs do not seem to cause that same increase in expenditure. This means that excess calories are more likely to be stored as fat.

"This profile leads to a greater propensity for energy storage, including both lean mass and fat mass. This can also mean a lower carbohydrate tolerance," he adds. Khloé Kardashian is an endomorph.

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Getty / Josiah Kamau / Contributor

Since this body type tends to be less active, you're more likely to use fat as fuel. "A nutrient distribution for this body type might be around 25% carbs, 35% protein, and 40% fat. Again, no math gymnastics. Just think higher fats and protein, lower carbs," says Eastham.

Next up, kefir—the buzzy new fitness drink wellness influencers are obsessed with right now.

 

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